Jun 27

If you get a warning like this be very careful about clicking ‘Allow.’  I’ve noticed that lots of websites have been asking to send me notifications.  What you may not realise is that these notifications do not come through your web browser. They  come through the OSX  built-in notifications that appear on the right of your screen.  This means that the notifications can appear when you’re working in a word processor,  typing an email,  anytime!  What’s worse is when a notification pops up there is no simple way to turn it off. You can dismiss it as read,  but you can be sure you will get another notification from that same website pretty soon.  I personally find this quite intrusive and it gets very annoying.

To turn off these notifications you need to go into your ‘System Preferences’  and then click on the notifications tab,  then scroll down to the website that has given you the notification,  and delete it. There will be an entry in the  notifications settings for any time you have clicked ‘Allow’ –  you need to go and delete them all one by one.  It’s quite a process!

Notifications

Once you have accepted a notification from a website in order to stop it you need to go into system preferences and notifications and delete it.

 

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Jun 18

Apple as usual have been putting out software updates regularly, but some of them are very big. Software update 10.13.5 is over 2GB and 10.13.4 was 2.5GB. We have 4 Macintosh computers in our household so when they each download it, that ads up to approx 10GB of downloads. This  is not a problem if you are on unlimited internet but if you have a small plan or if you are using your mobile phone hotspot for internet this can chew through your downloads pretty quickly!

Did you know that you can download the update once then copy it across to each computer by hand to save space? Here’s how.

Continue reading ⟩

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Nov 09

In OS X you can install software using the App Store but there is no option there to uninstall the software. Here are two ways to delete software in OS X. Continue reading ⟩

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Oct 30

On October 31 Apple released the first update to High Sierra, OSX 10.13.1. There were a few teething issues with High Sierra 10.13 so the release of 10.13.1 might be a good time to upgrade.

My ‘Software Update would not find High Sierra or the upgrade. I went to ‘Software Update’ only to be told ‘No Updates Available.’ If this is the case for you,  you can download High Sierra manually by going to this link:

http://appstore.com/mac/macoshighsierra (It’s 5.5GB)

The upgrade (10.13.1) is here:

https://support.apple.com/kb/DL1941?viewlocale=en_US&locale=en_US (2GB)

Read on for a couple of tips before you Install High Sierra. Continue reading ⟩

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Sep 10

 

Lots of websites are running articles about whether High Sierra (OSX 10.13)  will run on your current model Macintosh computer. The bottom line is, if your machine runs Sierra, it will run High Sierra. The hardware specs for 10.13 are exactly the same as for 10.12. But as usual I suggest you wait until the first update comes along before you upgrade. There are always a bugs in the first release.

If you are still running Yosemite (10.11), now might be a good time to upgrade to 10.12.

Continue reading ⟩

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Mar 12

osx installer

It’s very handy to have a bootable version of OS X on a thumb drive.

I have written how to do this using a program called DiskMaker X,  and I have written about how to do it from the command line here,  but after doing this a few times I find the most reliable method is the one outlined below.   It uses Apple’s built-in disk utility.This works with any version of OS X. Mountain Lion, Yosemite, El Capitan etc. You’ll need an 8G USB thumbdrive.

Continue reading ⟩

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